Cascais portugal

cascais portugal

Why visit Cascais Portugal?

With an incredibly picturesque town square, winding alleys of whitewashed homes and some of the best coastal views in Europe I immediately fell in love and was planning a move to Cascais my first afternoon there. Here are a few reasons why a visit to Cascais, Portugal needs to be on your travel radar.

What does Cascais mean?

Cascais ( Portuguese pronunciation: [kɐʃˈkajʃ] ( listen)) is a municipality in the Lisbon District of Portugal, located on the Portuguese Riviera. The population in 2011 was 206,479, in an area of 97.40 km 2. Cascais is an important tourist destination.

Why is Cascais called the Portuguese Riviera?

He moored his yacht in the bay below, the fortress became the royal family’s summer residence, and Cascais was dubbed “the Portuguese Riviera.” (You, too can enjoy living like a monarch, because today the Cidadela is a five-star hotel, one of Portugal’s loveliest pousadas.) Cascais has not forgotten its origins as a fishing village.

How to get from Cascais to Lisbon?

- A resort town just minutes from the urban attractions of a European capital - From Cascais, you can take the train to Lisbon (it’s a 40-minute journey, with several stops along the coast), and the bus to Sintra (number 403, which takes less than one hour, going through the countryside). See the guide to day trips from Cascais .

What is Cascais in Portugal like?

In a nutshell, Cascais is a picturesque coastal town, 30km west of Lisbon, filled with crystal clear water, Malibu-Barbie houses, fresh seafood and sandy beaches in Portugal. Easily accessible by train from the centre of Lisbon, Cascais can be explored in just one day.

Is Cascais a good place for a family holiday?

Cascais for a family holiday Cascais is a great holiday destination for families and young children. There are many hotels designed for families and children will be welcomed in all restaurants and tourist attractions. The beaches of Cascais are safe, with clean and calm sea waters, and are supervised in the summer.

Are the beaches in Cascais Portugal safe?

The beaches of Cascais are safe, with clean and calm sea waters, and are supervised in the summer. Cascais is significantly calmer than the larger resort towns along the Algarve coastline. As a country, Portugal is a very safe destination and the Portuguese are a family-focused nation.

Where is the best place to see the Cascais?

Boca do Inferno is located 2 km west of Cascais and is about a 30 minute walk from town. There are multiple viewing platforms where you can see the rock formation from both sides as well as a few souvenir shops. The wild, windswept coast of Cabo da Roca is the western most point in all over Europe.

What is the Portuguese Riviera?

The Portuguese Riviera ( Portuguese: Riviera Portuguesa) is the affluent coastal region to the west of Lisbon, Portugal, centered on the coastal municipalities of Cascais (including Estoril ), Oeiras and Sintra. It is coterminous with the Estoril Coast ( Costa do Estoril) and occasionally known as the Costa do Sol ( Sun Coast ).

Is Cascais a city in Portugal?

Cascais (Portuguese pronunciation: [kɐʃˈkajʃ]) is a city and municipality in the Greater Lisbon region of Portugal, located on the Portuguese Riviera. The population in 2011 was 206,479, in an area of 97.40 km2. Cascais is a major tourist destination and has many international residents.

What is the history of Cascais?

Cascaiss history as a cosmopolitan center originates in the 1870s, when King Luís I of Portugal and the Portuguese royal family made the seaside town his summer residence, thus attracting members of Portugals aristocracy, who established a summer community there.

Where did the Portuguese royal family stay in Cascais?

From 1870 to 1908, the Portuguese royal family from the House of Braganza-Saxe-Coburg and Gotha stayed in Cascais to enjoy the sea, turning the quiet fishing village into a cosmopolitan address. Thanks to King Luís, the citadel was equipped with the countrys first electric lights in 1878.

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